I am a farmer, Suitably Qualified Person (SQP) or veterinary professional resident in the:
Dosing Commandments

#6
Faecal Sample

Faecal Sample

Often penned as the gold-standard, remember that gastrointestinal worm eggs won’t be detectable in faeces for at least three weeks and lungworm up to four weeks, after our young/naïve animal ingests infective larvae. In older animals, lungworm larvae may not be detectable in faeces even when there is a significant larval challenge and symptoms. Also note that lungworm involves a different preperation/testing protocol to gastrointestinal worms/cocci. In the case of fluke, damage is done by the immature stages (non-egg layers) and it will be much later in the lifecycle before the parasite produces detectable eggs. Liver fluke testing also involves different protocols to gastrointestinal worms.

Anthelmintic effectiveness can be tested 10-14 days post-treatment for white, at 14-16 days for clear wormers and seven days post-treatment for yellow wormers.

Best practice with faecal sampling is to consult your vet or local SQP– they will advise on how to collect the sample. Samples should be taken as fresh as possible. When sampling a group take 50-100g in total, made up of freshly dropped dung from 5-10 animals. Disturbing lying animals should encourage passing of faeces. When sampling a single animal, unless you see them passing faeces and can collect it quickly and safely, put the animals into a chute and manually collect dung from the rectum with a gloved hand. Seal the sample as soon as possible and get it to your vet or SQP. Samples can typically be delivered in a jar or sealed sample bag. Do not freeze the sample.

The same vet or SQP will guide you on analysing the results and any required treatments based on these. Do not be alarmed by small burdens of rumen or liver fluke – there is little damage being done at the mature, egg-laying stage. However, note that the animal can be a potential contaminant for others. Treatment advice will be based on the sensitivity of the test and the circumstances of your own farm – e.g. parasite history, land type, production systems.

Often penned as the gold-standard, remember that gastrointestinal worm eggs won’t be detectable in faeces for at least three weeks and lungworm up to four weeks, after our young/naïve animal ingests infective larvae. In older animals, lungworm larvae may not be detectable in faeces even when there is a significant larval challenge and symptoms. Also note that lungworm involves a different preperation/testing protocol to gastrointestinal worms/cocci. In the case of fluke, damage is done by the immature stages (non-egg layers) and it will be much later in the lifecycle before the parasite produces detectable eggs. Liver fluke testing also involves different protocols to gastrointestinal worms.

Anthelmintic effectiveness can be tested 10-14 days post-treatment for white, at 14-16 days for clear wormers and seven days post-treatment for yellow wormers.

Best practice with faecal sampling is to consult your vet or local SQP– they will advise on how to collect the sample. Samples should be taken as fresh as possible. When sampling a group take 50-100g in total, made up of freshly dropped dung from 5-10 animals. Disturbing lying animals should encourage passing of faeces. When sampling a single animal, unless you see them passing faeces and can collect it quickly and safely, put the animals into a chute and manually collect dung from the rectum with a gloved hand. Seal the sample as soon as possible and get it to your vet or SQP. Samples can typically be delivered in a jar or sealed sample bag. Do not freeze the sample.

The same vet or SQP will guide you on analysing the results and any required treatments based on these. Do not be alarmed by small burdens of rumen or liver fluke – there is little damage being done at the mature, egg-laying stage. However, note that the animal can be a potential contaminant for others. Treatment advice will be based on the sensitivity of the test and the circumstances of your own farm – e.g. parasite history, land type, production systems.

Anthelmintic effectiveness can be tested 10-14 days post-treatment for white, at 14-16 days for clear wormers and seven days post-treatment for yellow wormers.

Best practice with faecal sampling is to consult your vet or local SQP– they will advise on how to collect the sample. Samples should be taken as fresh as possible. When sampling a group take 50-100g in total, made up of freshly dropped dung from 5-10 animals. Disturbing lying animals should encourage passing of faeces. When sampling a single animal, unless you see them passing faeces and can collect it quickly and safely, put the animals into a chute and manually collect dung from the rectum with a gloved hand. Seal the sample as soon as possible and get it to your vet or SQP. Samples can typically be delivered in a jar or sealed sample bag. Do not freeze the sample.

The same vet or SQP will guide you on analysing the results and any required treatments based on these. Do not be alarmed by small burdens of rumen or liver fluke – there is little damage being done at the mature, egg-laying stage. However, note that the animal can be a potential contaminant for others. Treatment advice will be based on the sensitivity of the test and the circumstances of your own farm – e.g. parasite history, land type, production systems.

Calibrating Dosing Equipment
Rotating Wormers
Quarantine Dosing
Weigh Animals
Coughing & Lungworm
Faecal Sample
Strategic Grazing
Dose & Return Or Dose & Move
Restrict Feed Pre-Dose
Embrace The Hook