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Cocci Corner - Meet our Cattle & Sheep Farmers

Farm case studies – Ireland

Coen Family

The Coen family, from Hollymount Co. Mayo, run a commercial suckler and sheep enterprise, as well as breeding pedigree Texel rams. It is a family-run farm with dad Liam and two sons David and Stephen.

They find the Texels to be a good solid breed with very good muscle.

They are pedigree ram producers so they need to ensure they produce rams of the highest quality.

"We want to produce rams that will produce numerous lambs that will grade well in a factory and make money for farmers.”

All the of the Coens have off-farm work commitments and using preventative products like Dycoxan means that they are in control and have peace of mind when they are away from the farm.

By preventing coccidiosis in their animals, they can maintain their reputation for producing, strong, hardy lambs that commercial farmer would be proud of.

Joe Nolan

Joe Nolan is a sheep farmer based in Kilconnor, Co. Carlow.

His farm consists of 750 mature ewes and 200 ewe lambs.

Joe is a part-time farmer and receives help from his father and his niece Aoife.

With a labour shortage on the farm, Joe likes to use preventative methods instead of treating individual animals.

Joe treats his lambs at four weeks-of-age with Dycoxan.

After removing coccidiosis from the equations, Joe sees a great improvement in his lambs and an increase in thrive.

Veterinary advice was given to Joe that if one animal shows symptoms of coccidiosis that all animals in the group should be treated, even if they have no symptoms.

Farm case studies – UK

Ian Armstrong

Ian ‘Seth’ Armstrong runs his family farm in Lorton which is based on the edge of the Lake District. He farms 100 Limousin cows and 650 breeding ewes. Seventy of his cows are purebred Limousins and his sheep flock consists of Swaledale, North England Mules, purebred Texels and purebred Leicesters.

Ian’s family previously rented the land he farms on 43 years.

Alongside his sister, they bought the farm 10 years ago.

Coccidiosis

There had been problems with coccidiosis on the farm in previous years. Now he uses Dycoxan on lambs that are four to five weeks-old and doses his calves at one month-old to prevent coccidiosis

“Since dosing with Dycoxan we have noticed an improvement in weight gain and overall health of our animals,” Ian says.

“It is vital to dose at the correct time because animals will not show symptoms until its too late. If one animal shows symptom all animal in the group will have coccidiosis,” he added.

Will Dodd

Will Dodd is a sheep and beef farmer based in West Belsay. He has 800 Suffolk ewes that lamb in the spring and keeps 200 mule ewes for breeding replacements.

Coccidiosis has been a problem in the past on his farm, now Will focuses on prevention.

He was able to determine that coccidiosis was present on his farm after animals showed symptoms of black bloody scour and he tested their faeces.

Will has found that symptoms can appear after the animal has been stressed.

All of the lambs get dosed at 4-6 weeks with Dycoxan to prevent problems from arising.

Watch the video below and check out out these articles

What is Coccidiosis?

How soon can animals get Coccidiosis?

How does an anti-coccidial drench work?

Preventing coccidiosis

Effects on Dairy Heifers

Farm case studies – UK

Ian Armstrong

Ian ‘Seth’ Armstrong runs his family farm in Lorton which is based on the edge of the Lake District. He farms 100 Limousin cows and 650 breeding ewes. Seventy of his cows are purebred Limousins and his sheep flock consists of Swaledale, North England Mules, purebred Texels and purebred Leicesters.

Ian’s family previously rented the land he farms on 43 years.

Alongside his sister, they bought the farm 10 years ago.

Coccidiosis

There had been problems with coccidiosis on the farm in previous years. Now he uses Dycoxan on lambs that are four to five weeks-old and doses his calves at one month-old to prevent coccidiosis

“Since dosing with Dycoxan we have noticed an improvement in weight gain and overall health of our animals,” Ian says.

“It is vital to dose at the correct time because animals will not show symptoms until its too late. If one animal shows symptom all animal in the group will have coccidiosis,” he added.

Will Dodd

Will Dodd is a sheep and beef farmer based in West Belsay. He has 800 Suffolk ewes that lamb in the spring and keeps 200 mule ewes for breeding replacements.

Coccidiosis has been a problem in the past on his farm, now Will focuses on prevention.

He was able to determine that coccidiosis was present on his farm after animals showed symptoms of black bloody scour and he tested their faeces.

Will has found that symptoms can appear after the animal has been stressed.

All of the lambs get dosed at 4-6 weeks with Dycoxan to prevent problems from arising.

Farm case studies – Ireland

Coen Family

The Coen family, from Hollymount Co. Mayo, run a commercial suckler and sheep enterprise, as well as breeding pedigree Texel rams. It is a family-run farm with dad Liam and two sons David and Stephen.

They find the Texels to be a good solid breed with very good muscle.

They are pedigree ram producers so they need to ensure they produce rams of the highest quality.

"We want to produce rams that will produce numerous lambs that will grade well in a factory and make money for farmers.”

All the of the Coens have off-farm work commitments and using preventative products like Dycoxan means that they are in control and have peace of mind when they are away from the farm.

By preventing coccidiosis in their animals, they can maintain their reputation for producing, strong, hardy lambs that commercial farmer would be proud of.

Joe Nolan

Joe Nolan is a sheep farmer based in Kilconnor, Co. Carlow.

His farm consists of 750 mature ewes and 200 ewe lambs.

Joe is a part-time farmer and receives help from his father and his niece Aoife.

With a labour shortage on the farm, Joe likes to use preventative methods instead of treating individual animals.

Joe treats his lambs at four weeks-of-age with Dycoxan.

After removing coccidiosis from the equations, Joe sees a great improvement in his lambs and an increase in thrive.

Veterinary advice was given to Joe that if one animal shows symptoms of coccidiosis that all animals in the group should be treated, even if they have no symptoms.

Watch the video below and check out out these articles

What is Coccidiosis?

How soon can animals get Coccidiosis?

How does an anti-coccidial drench work?

Preventing coccidiosis

Effects on Dairy Heifers

19
Mar